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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
. martin luther king jr. andrew seattle who is with the freedom from religion foundation. mr. stittle, abraham lincoln and dr. king too two amazing american icons you want to take their bibles and remove them from the ceremony. >> i much prefer dr. king's writing on the letter from the birmingham jail where he talks about the white church standing on the sideline mouthing trivialalities and pyes irrelevancy while he does the work of the civil rights movement. >> bill: you must know that dr. king invoked god in almost every speech that he made. >> article 2 section one of the constitution which lays out the oath does not say anything about the word so help me god. it says i will preserve to the best of my ability, preserve, defend and protect the states period. it's kind of ironic that the president is going to amend that in the middle of it. >> bill: do you know why george washington wanted the words god so help me god in? do you know why? >> george washington did not say so help me god. the first recorded instance is 1801. >> bill: if you look at his inaugural address it's peppered w
what religion or non-religion they have. it is a matter of trying to be honest, to make sure people are accountable, answerable, and responsible, especially when it comes to the orphan and the widow and the fatherless and motherless and poor, gay, bisexual, black, brown. let us never forget our precious indigenous brothers and sisters 1492, world war rahman one. i'm going to talk about it if i'm the last person in the country that does. my brothers and sisters, too. brother danny knows what i'm talking about. the [applause] that is a tradition that is open to all of as a matter what color we are. it is the choice is that we may. are we going to be so seduced and tinted dollar-tinted by the money dangled, the status and wealth offered, or are we going to be on our way to the graves. finally getting to our bodies, we say, this person was on fire for something bigger than just the ground and the worms. it was about love, justice for justice is what love looks like in public. there is only justice that generates and is something less than justice, you're going to need the love supreme o
of question about what religion he is. this is what makes it so hard for me to watch this. i think today, i am is going to clean out the attic instead of watching the inauguration. host: and that is chris in bedford, virginia. live pictures of the national mall as it fills in. 800,000 people are estimated to be here for president obama's second inaugural. that shot you see now is to give the capital. the white in the front, a friend of the mid-screen, those are seats. i guess those are reserved, so you do not have to get down there too early. the people that you see there are standing. there is a lot of standing going on, a lot of standing areas. people arrive several hours early, get through security, and wait for the events, and then join the parade. in a "usa today" this morning is this map that shows where some of the main areas of the events are taking place. here is the capital. here is the white house. the parade route will go, and here is the reviewing stand right in front of the white house here. there's a the two main places. but the third place that will get a lot of attention, were
and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to speak to, as you see
it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of press. somewhere i read that the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. >> mike: dr. king protested until the day he died by an assassin's bullet in memphis. his voice may have been silenced, but his message lives on 45 years later. joining us now from atlanta is dr. martin luther king, jr.'s niece, my good friend alvita king. >> hello, governor huckabee. it's good to be here and to the audience, hello. >> mike: well, you know, when i hear the words of your uncle, i am deeply, emotionally moved because i remember in my lifetime i've seen this incredible change in our country because of his dream and his willingness to put his life on the line to see it happen. as a member of the family, i want you to
in those da y when given the -- between franco and the vatican, which made serviery other religion illegal begin that chapter with a funny stormed i am in a bar in northen spain and the guys are trying to teach me how to pour the wonderful cider, the hard cider which perhaps you know -- you hold the bottle this wg your head, you have a glass with a very big opened last pointing out and the cider is supposed to hit the outside and bounce in and iite trying to do that and most of it is running down my pants all over the floor. little bit is going into the glass and one of the guys sa y to me -ke twe are pretty well drunk by this time and one of the unn y sg catholic or atheist? those seemed to be the only possibilities. i said no, i am neither a catholic nor an atheist. no kidding? you must be protestant. why would you think that? servierybody an american governt -- that is not true either. john kennedy -- so i said, what are you? i am jewish. you couldn't be jewish. he ghy couldn't i be it? r aou don't have any horns. i joked, i said i had some cut off when i came into the ford yn service.
makes religion into an instrument of hatred like j.b. stoner, there are plenty of those. they are near the top of the list. c-span: here is the book. second in the three volume series by taylor branch. this one is called "pillar of fire america in the king years 1963-1965." thank you. >> guest: thank you, brian. >>> you are watching book tv on c-span2. tonight we are at the national press club in washington, d.c. for their annual authors night and we are pleased to be joined here by robert merry who is the author of "where they stand the american presidents in the eyes of voters and historians." mr. merry, do we tend to like our presidents? >> i think the american people love their presidents. they love the presidency. but when they have a president that has not succeeded to the judge a failure, they vary on sentimentally cast them aside and that is our system to read that is what they were invited to do by the founders and by the constitution. >> do we have a short patience? >> we understand the constitution gave them hiring and firing authority over these guys every four years. so th
. the intersection of politics and religion, our exclusive interview with the decon of the national cathedral is coming up next. >> freedom and the dignity the individual had been more available and assured here than in any other place on earth. the price for this freedom at times has been high, but we have never been unwilling to pay that price. [ male announcer ] when we built the cadillac ats from the ground up to be the world's best sport sedan... ♪ ...people noticed. ♪ the all-new cadillac ats -- 2013 north american car of the year. ♪ for a limited time, take advantage of this exceptional offer on the all-new cadillac ats. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 consider if rolling it over to a schwab ira tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 might let you get more out of it. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like earning a bonus of up to $600 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in a schwab ira tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and 150 commission-free online trades tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus our rollover consultants handle virtually tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 all the details tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to help you focus on the bigger picture. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so give
on if you are a woman, a set of protections on your religion. i don't think many people realize in this country, if you are a transgender woman or a transgender man or gay or lesbian, you can lose your job in many states in this country. >> there's been legislation on it since 1974. it's been discussed in congress. we do not have this. it's something the president can put his weight behind and push for as well. there's something else i want to mention. california passed a law banning ex-gay therapy. it's being challenged, which is unfortunate, it would be nice to see a presidential endorsement. i think you could see expansion across the country. suicide and homelessness. a fourth of homeless people are lgbt. i think we could see movement on that as well. >> it's one of those things we realize the presidential bully pulpit is quite powerful and other times it feels not powerful at all. on this issue, he's moved the ball repeatedly. thank you. up next, remember when some people thought electing barack obama meant america was post racial? yeah. not so much. when we come back. [ mal
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
: amendment 1, congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the government to redress of grievances. amendment 2, a well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. amendment 3, no soldier shall in time of peace be quartered at any house without the consent of the owner nor in time of war but in a manner to be prescribed by law. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from kentucky, mr. barr. mr. barr:amendment iv the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. amendment v no person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous cri
. king says, regardless of nationality, race or religion to admit our wrongs and turn from them. i believe that the denial of the right to life is the greatest injustice we face in the world today. there is no compassion in killing, she sails. there is no justice in writing people out of the human race. history, mr. speaker, will not look favorably on today's abortion culture. we must indeed and instead work tirelessly to replace it with a culture of life. i would like to now yield to my good friend and colleague, macha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. -- marsha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. mrs. blackburn: thank you, mr. speaker, and i thank the gentleman from new jersey for the excellent work that he continues to do year in and year out on this issue. i appreciate his leadership and we do stand today and mark the 40th anniversary of the tragic roe v. wade decision and it really is said that not all life is created equal. and since the supreme court gave our government's approval if you will of on-demand abortion, there have been over 55 million lives lo
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)